Christmas Presents for Dogs

Christmas presents for dogs

Ho, ho, ho! Christmas is just around the corner and your dog is also looking forward to those exciting presents under the tree. Naturally, your canine companion is part of your close-knit family unit. Your dog will be very grateful for each and every present, whether it comes in the shape of a new blanket or a toy. Dogs give their owners love and loyalty every day and those of you who love giving gifts to your dog in return will find great ideas for the perfect present for your pet here.

Christmas fashion and accessories

Your dog needs a sturdy collar and harness so that it can walk comfortably beside you during your outings. Those who are looking for a fashionable Christmas present for their dog can’t go wrong with a stylish collar and lead set. If you don’t know the right size for your dog, you can measure the length of its back with a tape measure so the Christmas gift set should fit.

Collars, leads and harnesses are charming accessories that can make a big impression. Both large and smaller dogs need a well-fitting collar and a sturdy lead for going on walks. A good dog harness will offer comfort and security. There are different styles and colours of leads, collars and harnesses which means that the perfect Christmas present for every dog is out there.

A warm, cosy Christmas jumper

Christmas jumpers for dogs are always a great gift idea as they protect them from the cold. Jumpers for dogs come in all different colours, materials and sizes. The most important thing is to make sure that your dog’s belly area is protected from snow and ice on cold days.

Toy gift ideas for dogs

A soft toy is the ideal present for dogs that love to cuddle up. A wonderfully soft toy will make your dog’s heart jump for joy and the toy is sure to earn pride of place in your dog’s basket.

For a dog that loves to both snuggle and chew on something, there is no better Christmas present than a toy with treats hidden inside. Fun toys like the Sloth and Candy Cane toy combine cute design and squeaker function - perfect for cozy Christmas cuddles.

cuddly sloth dog toy christmas

Bear with rope dog toy

With its embroidered christmassy features this cute rope toy is beautiful to look at. The two rope handles are durable and it contains no swallowable parts. Perfect for tug-of-war.

bear with rope dog toy

A rope toy is the perfect Christmas present for a dog that loves a game of tug of war. This entertaining gift for dogs has a squeaker inside for maximum enjoyment. This bear rope toy  is suitably resistant to being tugged and pulled about. This robust rope can withstand even the most exuberant game of tug of war. It is a fantastic gift idea for your canine companion!

Turn your dog's toy box into a winter wonderland

If your dog’s toys have become worn after many hours of playing, Christmas can be a good time for an upgrade. Dogs love their toys and never want to let them go. At Christmas, it is a nice idea to give your dog a toy that can be enjoyed at any time of year. On the other hand, a winter-themed toy can brighten up your home when it is unpleasant outside. A soft toy can be used for both a boisterous game and to cosy up and relax with.

Snowman dog toy

Soft blankets with a Christmas theme

Some dogs find the hustle and bustle of Christmas disconcerting. By giving your dog a cuddly Christmas blanket as a gift you will offer it the chance to retreat. The blanket will allow your pet to have a relaxing sleep under the Christmas tree. These extra thick and cosy blankets protect against the cold ground while ensuring warmth and comfort. What’s more, the Vetbed® blankets are hygienic and hypoallergenic. Your dog will love dreaming the winter away on this blanket. It makes a great Christmas present for your pet!

Training equipment for your New Year’s resolutions

Aside from toys and clothing, sporty Christmas presents are a great idea for gifts to hide under the tree.

Once the festive season is over, the New Year comes in. Those who want to do more sport in the New Year can train together with their dog. You can give your dog some practical sports equipment that you can try out together later. There are many pieces of equipment and training gear that are made for dog sports. You and your canine companion will start the New Year right with the help of a sporty Christmas present.

Is your dog a sporty star or an acrobatic performer?

Whether you opt for agility, intelligence games, dummy training or jogging together, good equipment facilitates your training and contributes to your sporting success. Resolutions don’t have to wait until the New Year. Dogs are curious and eager to learn which means that you can start training straight away. The right equipment helps you to achieve your aim and to keep up your motivation.

Those who want to start training their dog can start by buying a fitting gift for Christmas.

More exciting Christmas presents for your dog!

In addition to special Christmas-themed presents for dogs, there are lots of other ideas for gifts, such as:

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