Dog Travel and Transport

Summer time is holiday time, and who wants to leave their four-legged pal at home when they go away? It’s good to be able to take your dog with you on your travels, and with a bit of careful preparation in advance, your holiday can still be as relaxing as you need it to be, even with Fido in tow. It’s not just the family’s cases that need to be packed: your dog needs its own travel bag too. But what do dogs really need to take with them on holidays, and what do you need to look out for when you’re planning ahead? Which destination is best for your pet? Read more

Dog Travel and Transport

Travelling with your Dog – Car vs. Airplane

Dog lovers like to take their four-legged best friends everywhere with them. As long as it's just ventures within the city, it's self-explanatory that our four-legged family members go everywhere with us. But what's the situation when it comes to holidays? What are the possibilities for animal lovers when moving a long distance? Is there the opportunity to take a dog on a plane? Or is it better for dog owners to tackle long journeys by car?

Entry Requirements for your Destination Country

Before you decide on a country to visit, it’s best to check with the country’s consulate to confirm what their entry requirements are relating to pets. To a large extent, EU countries have standard rules. The rules state that you must carry your pet’s individual Pet Passport with you at all times, your pet must have an up-to-date Rabies vaccination certificate, and since the rules changed in 2011 it also needs to be microchipped.

Important: If you will be returning to the EU from a country whose Rabies status is unknown, your pet must have a blood test. You need to arrange this before your departure. If you are travelling to another EU country, you need to arrange for your pet’s rabies vaccine to be administered a minimum of 21 days before travel. Other countries may have different rules. Always check with your vet for the latest advice.

Things to consider before you travel

So that you don’t get any nasty surprises upon arrival at your chosen resort, you should check that pets are allowed where you are staying, or if you have to pay a supplement to have your pet in your accommodation with you.

Check out the weather forecast at your destination before you travel, and make sure that there will be enough space nearby for your pet to get some exercise, or even a swim.

Make sure that you have the contact details of a local vet, in case of emergency.

Protecting your dog against parasites is especially important when travelling abroad. Ask your vet to recommend a suitable parasite repellent. You should still definitely pack a brush, flea comb and tick remover in your dog’s bag.

Take your dog’s usual food and snacks with you on holidays, to avoid any food issues. Don’t forget food and water bowls, lead, collar, towels and poop bags too!

Most importantly, don’t forget to pack any medicines that your dog takes regularly, as well as a doggy first-aid kit for emergencies.

Investing in an address label on your dog’s collar showing your home address as well as your address whilst on holiday is a sensible precaution. This will help you to be reunited with your dog much more quickly, should it get lost.

To ensure your dog feels at home whilst on holidays, make sure you take its bed and any favourite toys with you.

Have a look at all our dog transport boxes and travel accessories available in our dog shop!