Dog Breeds

All throughout history specific dog breeds all served a certain purpose and function. They worked on farms, as gun dogs, water dogs and so on. The Kennel Club, the oldest recognised kennel club in the world, categorises breeds of dogs into 7 distinct groups, known as The Kennel Club Groups. As of 2011, The Kennel Club recognises 211 different breeds of dog. Whilst the breeds listed in each group may appear to be varied with very little in common, they are characterised together because they were all bred for the same specific purpose. Read more

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FCI-Group

16 Dog breeds to your search

Beagle

Find information about Beagle's appearance, character, history, health & nutrition.

Bearded Collie

Fans of the Bearded Collie agree that those who aren't familiar with this dog breed simply have to get acquainted with it. And those who have experienced how a Bearded Collie bolts across meadows with its flowing fur, how it rolls around full of energy and joy and how it attentively and observantly takes into account its owners wishes become simply addicted to this original dog breed and its unique charm.

Black and Tan Coonhound

Originating in America, the Black and Tan Coonhound finds its vocation in hunting raccoons, since it detects and pursues their trace like nobody else. The Black and Tan Coonhound strongly resembles the Bloodhound, is even-tempered and gets on well with humans and fellow dogs.

Cavalier King Charles Spaniel

A particularly prominent characteristic differentiates the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel from the King Charles Spaniel: the length of its nose. Both breeds are named after the kings Charles I and Charles II, who were big spaniel fans. To this very day, the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel has lost none of its original charm.

Dalmatian

Medium to large in size with an unmissable black-and-white coat, the Dalmatian is a very active dog that happily seeks out mental and physical challenges.

German Boxer

Sturdy and nimble, stubborn and balanced, peaceful and defensive - the German boxer is full of contradictions, but this versatility makes the boxer such a great all-rounder.

German Shepherd

German Shepherd Dogs are the most widespread working breed in the world, but thanks to their eagerness to learn and human-loving nature, these versatile dogs also make for a great family pet.

Golden Retriever

The medium-sized Golden Retriever loves children and makes the ideal family pet! This dog is very human-oriented and easy-going, requiring a little grooming and plenty of exercise.

Goldendoodle

The Goldendoodle isn't a breed, but a pairing between Golden Retrievers and Medium or Standard Poodles. Marketed as a low-maintenance dog for allergy sufferers, this hybrid is enjoying increasing popularity amongst dog lovers, similar to the Labradoodle.

Labradoodle

The Labradoodle is a pioneer amongst designer dogs. Whilst there are serious endeavours in Australia to establish this Poodle and Labrador Retriever hybrid as a stand-alone breed, most specimens found in Europe aren't bred according to a standard.

Labrador Retriever

Obedient, fond of people and resilient, the medium-sized Labrador Retriever is an extremely popular family dog, though it likes to be mentally and physically stimulated too as an original working dog.

Miniature Schnauzer

With its coarse wiry fur and bushy beard and eyebrows, the Miniature Schnauzer is a smaller version of the Standard Schnauzer. However, it isn't inferior to its big brother whatsoever in terms of its endurance, vigilance and courage.

Newfoundland

If you would like to own a dog that is strong as a bear and swims like it was born in water, then look no further than the Newfoundland. Originally bred as working dogs to help fisherman in the far north of Canada, these dogs used to help their owners to pull their boats out of the sea. The breed still possesses immense strength and stamina today, as well as a passion for water, even though its working days are largely a thing of the past.

Pug

“Multum in parvo“ – this well-known Latin phrase aptly describes the Pug, as in its small body there really is “a lot of dog”! With its incomparable humour can charm, coupled with intelligence and depth, the Pug always provides its owner with plenty of entertainment.

Rough Collie

Attractive, intelligent, sporty and empathetic: the long-haired Collie – made famous through the TV dog “Lassie” – is one of the world's most well-known dog breeds. With its elegant appearance and many positive characteristics, these former Scottish herding dogs make ideal family dogs.

Smooth Collie

The well-toned physique, narrow head and hard, thick fur are reminiscent of a greyhound upon first glance. However, the Smooth Collie possesses all the positive Collie characteristics and is also considered lower-maintenance and more robust than Rough Collies.

Gundog Group

The gundog is a type of hunting dog used mainly to hunt birds in a variety of locations and were bred to help hunters find and retrieve game. Gundogs can be separated into three categories, depending on the dog’s hunting style. Pointing breeds were used to direct a hunter to their prey. The dogs would either ‘point’ with their noses or ‘set’ – freeze in place, to indicate to their owners that hunted game was nearby. And so, the names ‘Pointer’ and ‘Setter’ were used! Flushing dogs were trained to flush out birds and other animals from their hiding spots, making it easier for their owners to shoot or capture them. Many spaniels, like the Cocker Spaniel and Springer Spaniel are very popular flushing dogs. It’s easy to guess what Retrieving dogs do! Retrievers were trained to collect prey and return it without damage to their owners. Types of retrievers are famous for having ‘soft mouths’ because of this!

Hound Group

Hounds are very similar to gundogs but were actually the first hunting dogs. Hounds have a powerful sense of smell, which help them sniff out and track down whatever they are hunting. Some breeds of hound are also characterised by their speed. There are three distinct types of hound, with several different breeds within each subgroup. Sighthounds or gazehounds are dogs that use their fast speed for hunting and keep their prey in sight, whilst chasing them down.  Some of the most popular breeds of sighthound are Greyhounds, Salukis and Irish Wolfhounds. Sighthounds are predominantly used in hunting foxes, deer and hares.

Scenthounds, as their name suggests, have some of the most sensitive noses amongst dog breeds. Unlike sighthounds, they are not known for their speed but they make up for it in stamina. Scenthounds, such as the Beagle, Foxhound and Basset Hound, are well-known for using their amazing noses to sniff out prey or even lost people. Many scenthounds even have jobs as sniffer dogs!

The last group of hounds are difficult to classify because they use both their sense of sight and smell when tracking.

Pastoral Group

Pastoral dogs were originally kept for working with cattle, sheep and other livestock, and were used to help herd and manage them. Because these dogs were hard-working and reliable they were ideally suited for a life of intensive work. Unsurprisingly, a lot of dogs in this breed group are called Shepherds or Sheepdogs, for example German Shepherds and Old English Sheepdogs! However not every dog in the pastoral breed group are large breeds, with more compact breeds like the Corgi, Lancashire Heeler and Shelties also being traditional dogs for herding!

Terrier Group

This group of breeds is easy to identify! The terrier is typically a small breed that is a bit of a live spark! Terriers were originally kept to hunt small animals, such as mice, rats, rabbits and even weasels. Some were even bred to be small enough to fit down holes in order to catch their prey or scare them out. Just like pastoral breeds, some terriers are still kept as working dogs today and are used to keep their homes free from any vermin.

Toy Group

These dogs are not similar breeds, but instead they serve as companions tot their owners. Toy breeds are usually the very smallest dogs and some were originally ancient lap dog breeds or smaller versions of hunting dogs or terriers. These minute breeds are full of character and range from the fluffy Bichon Frise, to the elegant Cavalier King Charles Spaniel or the most classic of the toy breeds, the adorable Chihuahua!

Working Group

There are as many types of work for dogs as there are types of dogs. Lap dogs may work as therapy dogs, herding dogs may work livestock, and guard dogs may work at defence of people or property. Most dogs today are kept as pets rather than for any particular work. This group is for dog’s that are still used as working dogs, but in areas other than hunting or herding. Siberian Huskies and Alaskan Malamutes work as sled dogs, which is why they are bursting with energy and love nothing more than a good run! Other muscular or large dogs, like the Dobermann, Mastiff or Rottweiler still work as popular guard dogs today. And, of course, the iconic St. Bernard is famous for alpine rescues!

Utility Group

Dogs in the utility group tend to not fit into other group’s definitions. For example, the Shih Tzu would be perfectly suited in the Toy Group, but it is considered too large! Other dogs are placed in this group because they are no longer used for what they were originally bred for. Dalmatians, with their long legs and speed, were meant to run alongside horse-drawn coaches! Bulldog’s, as their name suggests, were originally bred for bull baiting and Shar Pei’s were used as fighting dogs. Thankfully these dogs are no longer used for what they were initially bred for, so they all happily sit together in the Utility Group!